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Posts Tagged ‘sara nightingale gallery’

Until a Little Bird, Francine Fleischer, Erica-Lynn Huberty, & Lucy Winton at Sara Nightingale Gallery

Thursday, May 9th, 2019

Sara Nightingale Gallery is pleased to present, Until a Little Bird, Francine Fleischer, Erica-Lynn Huberty, and Lucy Winton opening Saturday, May 11th, 6:00 – 8:00 p.m. The exhibition runs through June 3rd.

A needless life, it seemed to me

Until a little Bird

As to a Hospitality

Advanced and breakfasted.

This excerpt from Emily Dickinson’s deceptively charming poem “Our Little Kindsman After Rain,” suppositions that the bird—and its ecosystem—is actually a necessary part of God’s world and more important even than her own. Deceptively charming has also been used to describe the work of artists Francine Fleischer, Erica-Lynn Huberty and Lucy Winton.  The aesthetic and practical architecture of flight and nest-building, and the psychological architecture of the deep, dark woods, are themes universal to humans as well as birds, and they are themes that run deep in the work of Fleischer, Huberty and Winton.  “Until A Little Bird” brings together for the first time these three mid-career artists as they explore a common obsession each has held: that of the world of birds.

Erica-Lynn Huberty, Exhibit K (detail), Embroidery, polymer paint, graphite, paper, knitted silk thread, gesso, plain muslin, ink,stretcher frame, 11” x 9”

Suzanne Unrein, Slip at Sara Nightingale Gallery

Wednesday, May 8th, 2019

Sara Nightingale Gallery is pleased to present,  opening Saturday, May 11th, from 6:00 – 8:00 p.m. The exhibition will be on view through June 3rd.

Suzanne Unrein grew up among swamps, alligators, mossy oaks and hundreds of varieties of birds in the coastal towns of Florida.  Her travels and encounters with animals in Mexico, South Africa, Borneo and Bali have contributed to her vibrant worlds where the animality of humans plays within a world of beasts. The drawings for Slip began at Unrein’s art residency in Can Serrat, El Bruc, Barcelona, Spain, in August of 2018 and have continued with her return to New York City.  In the drawings, Unrein moves away from the exuberant brushstrokes and vibrant color of the paintings. She calms down the motion and simplifies the palette to concentrate on the more psychological aspects of the work. Two large paintings inspired by the drawings will also be exhibited.

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Sara Nightingale Gallery is pleased to present Timeshapers

Sunday, November 25th, 2018

Sara Nightingale Gallery is pleased to present Timeshapers, recent work by Paul O’Connor, Mimi Saltzman and Johnny Wong, opening Saturday, Dec.1 from 5:00 pm – 7:00 pm. The exhibition runs through Dec. 28.

Timeshapers brings together three friends who met five years ago in the art community of Taos, NM. One of them, Mimi Saltzman, was given an antique hourglass, which became her “shape muse”. The other two, Paul O’Connor and Johnny Wong, subvert the traditional rectangular form of painting by employing hexagons and quadrilaterals or rotating the square to a diamond shape. While Saltzman and Wong specifically address time as a subject of their work, O’Connor’s wall pieces, with their “meditation holes”, encourage the viewer to experience mindful expansion, which can temporarily alter a viewer’s perception of time. The three friends, based in Taos, Sag Harbor and New York, bridge time-zones and geographies with their artistic relationship. When Johnny Wong stacks two diamond shaped paintings, one on top of the other, the resulting shape nods to the hourglass in Saltzman’s work. Similarly, O’Connor’s geometric shapes include diamonds which echo Wong’s.

Sara Nightingale Gallery is pleased to present, Perry Burns, Flower Galaxies

Thursday, August 30th, 2018
Sara Nightingale Gallery is pleased to present, Perry Burns, Flower Galaxies. The exhibition runs through September 22 and consists of new and recent work from Burns’ ongoing Flower Tapestry series.

 The Flower Tapestry paintings merge elements of Islamic design and European tapestries, expressed through the visual language of abstraction. Design and its connection to human history and spirit are central concerns for Burns. He has long been inspired by pattern and rhythmic repetition, which he views as the representation of a spiritual realm, a “visual mantra”. 

For this exhibition, Burns reflects specifically on The Blue Mosque in Istanbul, which he visited in 2010. Standing in awe, looking up at the facade, Burns realized the mosque was covered in an “impossible” pattern of over two hundred thousand hand-painted tiles, each one unique. Together they formed a geometry of flowers and climbing vines, over and throughout the mosque, that visually reinforced the spiritual nature of the “massive earthbound” structure. 

Sara Nightingale Gallery presents Monica Banks, Pulchritude and Paton Miller, Paintings

Friday, June 29th, 2018
Sara Nightingale Gallery is pleased to present Monica Banks, Pulchritude and Paton Miller, Paintings, opening Saturday, June 30 from 6:00 – 8:00 p.m. The exhibition runs through July 26.
 
Pulchritude, a word that sounds ugly, means beauty. Monica Banks’ latest series of porcelain confections and celebratory cakes embrace this paradox. Rendered in sumptuous pastel hues, her ceramic monuments to domesticity examine ugliness, tragedy, creepiness and asymmetry, qualities that beauty must inherently contain in order to be deeper and more meaningful than mere “prettiness”. As usual, Banks’ reflections on problems in the world at large inform her depiction of tiny figures within and on top of the confections. Banks gives these disenfranchised creatures attention they would not otherwise receive. She has said, “All moments deserve a tribute, whether those moments are hopeful or tragic.” Her cakes continue to serve as empathic memorials honoring animals and humans, as well as objects and mythical characters. 
 
Paton Miller’s oil paintings depict ordinary scenes enhanced by his unique inventiveness. Inspired by world travel, as well as domesticity and family life, Miller employs an earthy, neutral pallet, reinforcing his connection to nature and the outdoors. Human figures, as well as animals and invented “species”, populate his canvases. These subjects bring to life Miller’s allegorical narratives that reference other places in other times. Several motifs appear repeatedly in his works: waves depicted as triangular blocks of color, mules and other animals carrying objects on their backs, boats, water and exotic foreign landscapes. When Miller travels, he paints the people he meets as a way to get to know them.

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